Eyetec.net Academy - Course Sign-up

 

  • Course descriptions and sign-up links are listed below.
  • You must be logged in before you go to one of the course purchase pages. If you are already registered, login at the top of this page if not already logged in.
  • If you are not registered, use the following link. Doing so will allow you to easily return to this page and login. The following link will open in a new tab on your browser. After the registration process, return to this page/tab and login at the top of the page.

Open registration tab by clicking here.

 

Courses are listed below, ordered by complexity and cost (course fee). These courses are used by ophthalmology and optometry offices and clinics to train new hires who have no experience in the field of eyecare. One or more of these courses can give you an advantage when looking for an entry level job. Be sure to read all of the course descriptions before you decide to purchase.

How do I know these courses have any value?

Eyetec.net has been a  provider of online ophthalmic training courses since 1998. Thousands of ophthalmic technical personnel have used the eyetec.net exam prep courses to become certified and to move to the next level of certification. Eyetec.net has been a provider of JCAHPO approved CE courses over many years.

Disclaimer: Although we believe these courses can be helpful when applying for a job in eyecare, there is no guarantee that you will find employment in the field.

How do I know if there is job demand in my geographic area?

This is a very important question. Scroll down on this page below the course listings for a "how-to" discussion. You should determine job demand before you invest time and money in a course.

 

Course Title: Diagnostic Tester Training

Short description: Diagnostic testing is a big part of ophthalmology. This course gives you training on the major testing modalities. This is particularly valuable because an employer can put you to work right away. Realize that this course cannot provide you with hands-on training. The hands-on training will come after you are hired. However, the knowledge you gain from this course will give you a big head-start with diagnostic testing. This course can be combined with the next course on the list, the Ophthalmic Assistant Basic Training Course.

Long description: This link will open in a new tab/window. To return to this page, close the linked window/tab.  Click here for more detailed information on this course.

Estimated time to complete: 5-10 hours

Access time: 60 days (2 months)

Course fee: $37.00

Certificate: Certificates upon completion.

 


Course Title: Ophthalmic Assistant Basic Training Course

Short description: This course gives you the basic information that a new hire learns in the first weeks after being hired. Topics include eye diseases, history taking, basic optics, visual acuity testing, and more. This course can be combined with the previous course on the list, Diagnostic Tester Training.

Long description: This link will open in a new tab/window. To return to this page, close the linked window/tab.  Click here for more detailed information on this course.

Estimated time to complete: 5-10 hours

Access time: 90 days (3 months)

Course fee: $39.00

Certificate: Certificates upon completion.

 

 

Course Title: Ophthalmic Scribe Exam Prep Course

Short description: In a medical practice, a scribe is a person who follows the doctor into the exam room with the patient. It is the scribe's job to enter information into electronic medical records software while the doctor examines the patient. In order to be efficient, the scribe must be very knowledgeable regarding ophthalmic diseases, diagnosis, treatments, and medical terminology in general. This course is designed to prepare assistants to pass the scribe certification exam. However, you cannot take the certification exam until you work in the field. Certification is not required to get a job as an ophthalmic scribe.

Long description: This link will open in a new tab/window. To return to this page, close the linked window/tab. Click here for more detailed information on this course.

Estimated time to complete: 10-15 hours

Access time: 90 days (3 months)

Course fee: $47.00

Certificate: This course does not generate a certificate. You should print the course homepage after you have completed the course. The homepage gives the title of each content area and will show that you completed the quiz for each. The page will also show your quiz scores.

 


Course Title: Ophthalmic Assistant 12 Week Course for New Hires

Short description: This is a popular course for ophthalmology offices that train people with no experience in eyecare. It is a much more extensive course than the courses that are listed above. This course includes all of the training from the courses listed above, plus much more. Although the cost of the course is very reasonable, the time commitment will be significantly greater when compared to the other courses listed.

Long description: This link will open in a new tab/window. To return to this page, close the linked window/tab. Click here for more detailed information on this course.

Estimated time to complete: 60 hours

Access time: 144 days (5 months)

Course fee: $99.00

Certificate: This course does not generate a certificate. You should print the course homepage after you have completed the course. The homepage gives the title of each content area and will show that you completed the quiz for each. The page will also show your quiz scores.

 

Before you invest time and money in courses, determine if there is ophthalmic assistant job demand in your area:

1. Search job sites for the terms "ophthalmic assistant" and "ophthalmic technician". Popular job sites include indeed.com and monster.com. It is best to search by city or town instead of by zip code. Also by nearby cities and towns.
2. If you don't find any job listings in your area of interest, then there is likely not a shortage, at least at the time of the search. You can try again in a few weeks.
3. The listings may include jobs for "optometric assistant" and "optician". If you don't know the difference, see descriptions here. Your preference should be "ophthalmic assistant" jobs as these will pay more, with a better chance of advancement.

If you have found job listings in your area, and you have armed yourself with some pre-education, read on.

Respond to any job listings in your geographic area of interest

1. You will need a cover letter, a resume, and proof of completion of courses that you have taken. There are many websites that have good instruction/examples on how to construct a resume and a cover letter. If you are bi-lingual, especially spanish/english (in the US), this will be a big plus that should be highlighted in the cover letter and the resume.
2. Any employer will do a search of you on social media. If you have questionable content on Facebook for example, you might suspend your account while you are searching for a job. If your social media account has nothing but family oriented posts, then you are fine. If you don't have a profile on Linkedin, you should create one with an appropriate amount of detail, and list your link in your resume.
3. If you get an in-person or video interview, dress conservatively, cover any tattoos, go easy on makeup, do not wear jewelry, and generally look pleasant. Speak clearly and respectfully, and smile.
4. Emphasize your interest in the field and your eagerness to learn.
5. Flexibility on your part in terms of hours worked and days worked will be a big plus. For example, although you may not like working Saturdays, this may get you an entry level job on the field.
6. What if they offer you a different job, such as front desk? If your prospects for an ophthalmic assistant job are not great, you might take this opportunity. If you prove yourself to be a good employee at the front desk, make known that you are interested in moving to an ophthalmic assistant position, and this would likely happen.

What to do if you don't get any interviews, or if you don't get hired from one or more interviews

You could list your resume on one or more jobs sites, but there is a better strategy:

1. Do an online search of your geographic area of choice for all of the ophthalmology offices and clinics in the area. Make a list of the practice names and addresses. If a practice has multiple offices, find out which office contains the business office.
2. Send a cover letter, your resume, and your proof of courses taken addressed to the "office manager" of each practice. It would be even better to address the mail to a specific person in the practice. You can obtain the name by calling the practice and asking for the name of the person who does the hiring of the technical personnel. Be sure to confirm the address of the person.
3. If you don't hear back from any of the offices with an offer of an interview, repeat the mailings in about 3 months from the time of the first mailing.

What to do if you do get hired

1. Be on time for work. Leave work only when you have permission to do so.
2. Be an eager learner and a steady worker.
3. Learn to work efficiently while always being pleasant with patients and co-workers.
4. If your employer does not offer a specific study program, purchase the eyetec.net COA Exam Prep Course and work your way through it. You can apply to take the COA certification exam after 1000 hours of work (about 6 months time working 40 hours a week).
5. Learn how to use every instrument/piece of equipment in the office. Learn how to maintain and repair them as well. If you come across equipment manuals, look them over for useful information.
6. You will not always receive good instruction/good advice from your co-workers, but always be respectful when someone is trying to teach you something.
7. When you have learned useful information, and the situation presents itself, be willing to share your knowledge with your co-workers, but don't come off as a "know-it-all".
8. Be friendly with others, but do not gossip. In downtimes, avoid talking outside of exam rooms and waiting areas when patients are being seen. Always conduct yourself in a professional manner.
9. If all of the patients have been worked up, offer to go in with the doctor and act as a scribe until the doctor has finished with all of the patients.